Cover of: Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa | Sandra Blakely

Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa

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Cambridge University Press
European history: BCE to c 500 CE, History: World, Greece, History, History - General History, Africa, Ancient Greece, Metallurgy, Antiquities & Archaeology, General, History / General, Miscellanea, Rel
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7766862M
ISBN 100521855004
ISBN 139780521855006

In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in which iron plays a Cited by: In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in 5/5(1).

In this volume, first published Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa bookSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in which iron plays a central role.

Noting the rich semantic web of associations that has connected metallurgy to magic, birth, kingship, autochthony, and territorial possession in both Greek and African cultures, Blakely examines them together in order to cast light on the Greek demons Brand: Cambridge University Press.

Greece and Africa. Notably, the evidence she adduces for Greekand Africanirontechnologymilitatesagainstderivation, perhaps most importantly so for the old hypothesis of Mediterranean origins for African metallurgy through Phoenicia.

One might wish for a less synchronic approach to the sources for the daimones. begins her chapter on iconography, for example. Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa – By Sandra Blakely. Edmund P. Cueva. Xavier University. Search for more papers by this author.

Edmund P. Cueva. Xavier University. Search for more papers by this author. First published: 26 November Author: Edmund P. Cueva.

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- Myth, ritual, and metallurgy in ancient Greece and recent Africa - by Sandra Blakely Index CITATION INDEX. Accius of iron from Greece to Africa, 56–57, 62, 64, of iron, sub-Saharan, 57–61, Dikte, Mount, – N MYTH, RITUAL, AND METALLURGY in ANCIENT GREECE AND RECENT AFRICA In this volume, Sandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associ- ated with ancient Greek daimones who made metal and African rituals in whichFile Size: KB.

Blakely, Sandra,Myth, ritual, and metallurgy in ancient Greece and recent Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, In Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa, Sandra Blakely undertakes an ethnographic examination, based on sophisticated an thropological concepts, of the iron-smelting processes, rituals, and myths of the Hausa, Fipa, BaKongo, and other peoples of sub-Saharan Africa.

Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa的话题 (全部 条) 什么是话题 无论是一部作品、一个人,还是一件事,都往往可以衍生出许多不同的话题。. The ancient Greeks have contributed so much to modern civilization, especially regarding education, philosophy, science, art, politics, and language, among other things.

But, their legacy does not end there. One of the most enduring things about ancient Greece is the mythology.

Zeus, Minotaur, Hercules, Achilles, Prometheus Author: Mia Stokes. Sandra Blakely, Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), pp.

Details Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa EPUB

Adrienne Mayor 1 International Journal of the Classical Tradition vol pages – () Cite this articleAuthor: Adrienne Mayor. Synopsis In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in which iron plays a central : Sandra Blakely.

In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in which iron plays a central role.5/5(1). Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa Sandra Blakely Article in Journal of anthropological research 63(4) December with 50 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Review of Sandra Blakely's "Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa". In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in which iron plays a central role.

Noting the rich semantic web of associations that has connected metallurgy to magic, birth, kingship, autochthony, and territorial possession in both Greek and African cultures, Blakely.

Metallurgy: Prehistoric metallurgy, mining and extraction of ores. Article: (Bulgaria - c. 3, BC) - Thousands of uniformly 'pressed' gold 'beads' were discovered in a Thracian horde in the Bulgarian 'Valley of the Kings'.The beads, which are only millimetres in diameter, have the appearance of minute 'washers', which show evidence of 'pressing' on both sides.

Description Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa EPUB

Myth, ritual, and metallurgy in ancient Greece and recent Africa. [Sandra Blakely] -- "In this volume, Sandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones who made metal and African rituals in which iron plays a central role.

In this volume, first published inSandra Blakely considers technological myths and rituals associated with ancient Greek daimones, who made metal; and African rituals in. Read "Sandra Blakely, Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), pp., International Journal of the Classical Tradition" on DeepDyve, the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.

MYTH AND RITUAL IN EARLY GREECE BY A. MARLOW, M.A. interpreted with absurd eccentricity as in Lord Raglan's book The Hero (London, ), the whimsical interpretations in which of which the most recent are Myth and Ritual in the Ancient Near East () and The Ancient Gods ().

Before narrowing our attention to the specifically Greek. - The science behind metallurgy goes far back in time, but it's uncertain when and where humans invented metal smelting. Researchers now think they have found the answer to this long-debated question in the history of technology.

Apparently, metallurgy does not have a single origin, but probably arose at various locations at about the same time. This article traces the beginnings of metallurgy in the eastern half of the Africa content, focussing on three zones: (1) Myth, ritual and metallurgy in Ancient Greece and recent Africa.

New York: Cambridge University Press. Google by: Table of contents for Myth, ritual, and metallurgy in ancient Greece and recent Africa / Sandra Blakely.

Bibliographic record and links to related information available from the Library of. The word myth comes from Ancient Greek μῦθος [mȳthos], meaning 'speech, narrative, fiction, myth, plot'.In Anglicised form, this Greek word began to be used in English (and was likewise adapted into other European languages) in the early nineteenth century, in a much narrower sense, as a scholarly term for 'a traditional story, typically involving supernatural beings or forces, which.

We often think of classical Greek society as a model of rationality and order. Yet as Walter Burkert demonstrates in these influential essays on the history of Greek religion, there were archaic, savage forces surging beneath the outwardly calm face of classical Greece, whose potentially violent and destructive energies, Burkert argues, were harnessed to constructive ends through the Reviews: 1.

Sandra Blakely, Myth, Ritual, and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, ), pp. Blakely, Sandra. Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Jacobsen, Michael A. "The Meaning of Mantegna's Battle of Sea Monsters." The Art Bulletin.

Nonnus. Dionysiaca. (trans. by L R. Lind) Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University : Riley Winters.

African Myths and Tales. New York: Dell. Finnegan, R. Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Boitani, P. The Anthropology of Ancient Greek Sacrificial Ritual and Myth. Berkeley: University of California Press. Excerpted from her book: Not Out of Africa: How Afrocentrism Became an Excuse to Teach Myth as History. Why I wrote the book. In the fall of I was asked to write a review-article for The New Republic about Martin Bernal's Black Athena and its relation to the Afrocentrist movement.

The assignment literally changed my life.Myth, Ritual and Metallurgy in Ancient Greece and Recent Africa, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Edited volumes In preparation: “Religious Convergence in the Ancient Mediterranean,” Studies in Ancient Mediterranean Religions, Lockwood Press: Atlanta.Ancient Greek god of fire, metallurgy, and crafts, Hephaistos was the brilliant blacksmith of the Olympian gods, for whom he fashioned magnificent houses, armour, and ingenious stos had his workshop beneath volcanos - Mount Etna on Sicily being a favourite haunt - and was, with his lame foot, unique as the only less-than-perfect god.

To the Romans, he was known as Vulcan or Volcan.